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Do You Practice Safe Selfies? Start Now.

 Erie Insurance: http://bit.ly/2ouEB2A  by Leah Knapp

Erie Insurance: http://bit.ly/2ouEB2A

by Leah Knapp

The selfie: That simple act of holding up your phone and snapping a photo of yourself. (Please note: Having someone take a photo of you by yourself is not, by definition, a selfie.)

What once seemed reserved for teens obsessed with documenting every aspect of their lives and celebrity red carpet events now seems to pervade all corners of our lives. Even politicians have mastered the art of the selfie.

The practice seemed to hit its peak in 2013 when Oxford Dictionary declared “selfie” its word of the year. Yet, its ubiquity shows no sign of slowing.

And while selfies can be an easy way to capture a moment, they can be dangerous.

There are some statistics around selfie fatalities. But there is far less data about injuries resulting from selfies, likely because there is no reporting mechanism for such things.

…And let’s face it, who wants to admit to spraining an ankle taking a photo of themselves?

At last count, there were 13 landmarks around the globe that have actually banned selfies in some form or fashion.

And consider this: A 2015 survey by Erie Insurance found that 4 percent of drivers admit to taking selfies while they’re driving, while another 23 percent have seen others do it. With more than 420,000 people injured in car accidents involving distracted driving each year, it’s time to get serious about keeping your hands on the wheel and eyes on the road.

With that in mind, we’ve created these simple reminders for you to share and encourage others to #PracticeSafeSelfies. Download them below and help us spread the word. To download, right click and select "Save As."

Just don’t post them #whiledriving.

Great Shot

 

 

 

Keeping Kids Safe in the Backyard

by Erie Insurance on August 2, 2017

 

Many of us love the idea of turning our backyards into an inviting oasis where the kids can let loose while the adults unwind. Who wouldn’t want to kick back and listen to the happy squeals of their kids as they splash in the pool, bounce on the trampoline or swing higher on the swings?

Play it Safe

It’s important to take an inventory of your backyard and identify potential risks. Your insurance agent can help you determine what liabilities you have and what coverage limits are best for your specific situation. It’s about the peace of mind knowing you, your family (and the neighborhood kids) are protected if something happened.

It’s important to understand that swimming pools and trampolines are known as an “attractive nuisance.” In other words, you may have something that's kept outside that could tempt a child to sneak into your yard and use it. If that kid ends up getting hurt or worse, you could be held liable, even if they were trespassing.

Bottom line, there are many situations where if someone gets hurt at your home, you’re financially responsible for his or her  injuries. To protect yourself, talk to your agent. Understand what is covered under your homeowners policy and what isn’t, and consider an umbrella policy for more liability coverage for your backyard enhancements.

In addition, take a few extra steps to protect your family and your visitors. We’ll walk through some of the most common causes of backyard accidents and what homeowners can do to protect their families, their guests and their finances — without sacrificing the fun factor.

Up first, trampoline safety.

Young, Fabulous - and Insured: Protect your (Temporary) Home

by Tara Maciulewicz on July 20, 2017

 

Insurance probably isn’t top of mind for young adults heading off to college or renting their first apartment. But with freedom comes responsibility—and in this case, the responsibility is to make sure that they and their belongings are protected by getting the proper renters and auto coverages.

The good news is that many young adults may not need to take out additional policies and, for those who do, some policies cost mere cents a day. ERIE can help with policies that fit whatever life stage you’re currently in.

Protect your place

Dorm dwellers and apartment renters alike should definitely get schooled in insurance.

“When kids are away at school, they’re considered residents of their parents’ household and are covered to the full limit of the parents’ homeowners or renters policy until they’re 24,” says Jennifer Koebe, ERIE’s vice president and regional underwriting officer. This holds true as long as the young adult is a full-time student and maintains residency in their parents’ home—which they must have lived in directly prior to moving out—when not on campus or in an apartment during the school year.

Things are a little stickier with non-full-time students and renters who are 24 years of age or older. To protect this group’s personal property against damage from fire, smoke, theft, vandalism, lightning and other common disasters, they’ll need to take out a standard renters insurance policy, such as an ErieSecure Tenant® policy.

This policy offers personal property coverage, loss of use (coverage that kicks in to take care of living expenses associated with a temporary relocation), personal liability protection, and medical payments for damages or injury that occur in your rental unit or as a result of personal activities away from home. And, similar to how an ERIE homeowners policy works, the customer gets worldwide coverage that protects his or her possessions even if they are damaged, lost or stolen when away from home, whether the location in question is an exotic locale or a friend’s place across town.

The ErieSecure Tenant® protection (including liability protection), which starts at $100,000 in coverage and goes up to $1 million, typically costs less than $120 a year and far less when paired with an ERIE auto policy. It's recommended that renters consider a personal liability limit of at least $300,000 and that they opt for guaranteed replacement cost over actual cash value.

What’s the difference?

“In an actual cash value settlement, if something happened to that TV you’ve had for 15 years, you’d receive the money it was worth with the depreciation factored in,” Koebe says. “With a guaranteed replacement cost settlement, you’ll be able to buy a brand new TV. There’s a small difference in premiums between the two, but the value that replacement cost provides Customers dealing with an unfortunate situation is significant.”

Tips to keep your stuff safe

Even with an insurance policy in place, it still pays to practice some tips to protect your property and keep claims in check. Here are a few:

 

  • Safeguard pricier items—or just leave them at home. According to the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool,* over 22,000 dorm burglaries occurred in the years 2013, 2014 and 2015 combined. Expensive bikes, jewelry, watches and laptops are some of the most frequent targets, so take care to lock them up or leave them at a trusted residence that doesn’t have a high level of foot traffic. Renters should also be aware that ERIE has a $3,000 coverage limit per item for the theft of things such as jewelry and watches. If a prized possession is worth more than that limit, make sure to talk to your agent about getting additional coverage for that item.
     

  • Lock your doors all the time. It sounds obvious, but most dorm thefts occur during the day.
     

  • Fireproof your home. Don’t leave candles, grills and cigarettes—the most common causes of fires—unattended. To be extra safe, consider flameless candles, indoor grills and kicking the habit. 
     

  • Engrave electronics. Engravings make it easier for police to identify stolen computers, televisions and tablet.
     

  • Create a home inventory. By saving all receipts from major purchases, making a detailed list of everything of value in your home or apartment, and photographing or videotaping your possessions, submitting a claim will be easier. You’re also more likely to receive reimbursement for what’s stolen or damaged.
     

  • Consider adding Identity Recovery coverage to your policy. College students are increasingly targets of identity fraud. The Federal Trade Commission reports college students (ages 20–29) represent the highest percentage of all identity theft complaints. College students have pristine credit records and they’re exposed to situations that can leave them vulnerable to identity theft. Fortunately, it’s affordable to add an ErieSecure® Advantage Bundle endorsement, which will help cover the cost of identity theft by reimbursing you up to $25,000 of fraudulent credit card fees. The Advantage Bundle also includes increased sublimit coverage for theft-related losses.

 

Like a favorite roommate, ERIE is there for you. Talk to an Erie Insurance agent today to get the right coverage for you.

 

Insurance 101

There’s no doubt about it—insurance can be as much of a head-scratcher as a trick question on a final exam.

While we can't make insurance any less complicated, we can help it make more sense. To understand how ERIE’s policies can safeguard you and give you peace of mind, check out these ERIE resources:

 

  • ERIE’s website–You'll find lots of helpful information and insurance glossaries along with a free online auto quote tool, a life insurance calculator and plenty of FAQs in the Support Center.
     

  • Eriesense blog–Here, you have access to hundreds of stories to help you live better and safer. For example, you can search on a variety of topics and find everything from the latest trends in cars and tech to interactive quizzes and videos.
     

  • Your ERIE agent–Your knowledgeable agent is there to help you, so don’t hesitate to throw any questions his or her way. If you don’t have an ERIE agent, you can find an agent at erieinsurance.com.
     

  • Your policy–For the final word, consult your individual policy. And if you still have questions, talk to your agent.
     

  • Another great resource for insurance info is the Insurance Information Institute’s website.

 

Read about protecting your wheels next.

 

*This analysis cutting tool was designed to provide rapid customized reports for public inquiries relating to campus crime and fire data. The data are drawn from the OPE Campus Safety and Security Statistics website database to which crime statistics and fire statistics are submitted annually, via a web-based data collection, by all postsecondary institutions that receive Title IV funding (i.e., those that participate in federal student aid programs). This data collection is required by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and the Higher Education Opportunity Act.

Insurance products are subject to terms, conditions and exclusions not described in this article. For additional coverage questions, please refer to our disclaimer and talk to an ERIE agent for policy details. Coverage is not available in all states.

Protect Your Pets from Hot Cars

by Jennifer Sonntag on July 7, 2017

 

To a dog, there’s nothing more exciting than going for a ride, having the window rolled down and feeling the wind in your ears. However, when the car stops and owners run a “quick” errand, what can happen to your pet is dangerous. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), hundreds of pets die in hot cars each year. Time passes faster than owners realize and car temperatures can climb to well over 115 degrees, putting your pet’s life in danger.

How fast does a car’s temperature rise? Here are some examples:

When it’s 70 degrees outside, your car’s temperature inside is 89 degrees after just 10 minutes and up to 104 degrees after a half hour. If you’re traveling with your pet on an 85 degree day, your car’s temperature is 104 degrees after 10 minutes and nearly 120 degrees after a half hour. Pets cool themselves by panting and through their skin and have a harder time cooling down in hot weather. In a hot car, heat stroke can happen in just a few minutes.

What to do if you see a pet in a hot car

Take caution when you see a pet in a hot car. If you identify a pet is in distress in a hot vehicle, the best thing to do is contact local law enforcement. Some states have laws against leaving a pet in a hot car, however, it varies. Obtain guidance from law enforcement before taking action and breaking a car window on your own. Once you call law enforcement, stay by the vehicle and keep an eye on the pet until help arrives.

How to treat a pet with heat stroke
First, it’s important to know the signs of a heat stroke:

Warning signs: panting, drooling and lethargy
Advanced stage: grey or blue gums, limp body posture with heavy breathing and the pet may be in shock

Cooling the Pet Down

 

  • Get your pet to an air-conditioned environment
  • Work to cool the pet down by wetting the ears and pads of the feet with cool water (do not use frigid water, use cool water).
  • Place cool, wet towels over the shoulder/neck, under the front legs and in the groin area
  • Refresh the water frequently
  • If the pet will drink, provide cool water or small ice chips


What to do if the pet is unresponsive

  • Call an emergency veterinarian immediately and tell them you’re on your way.
  • If the gums are gray/blue, they are in need of immediate treatment and should be rushed to the nearest emergency treatment center.
  • They will help cool the dog and administer subcutaneous fluids.


Additional Tips for Pet Owners in the Summer

  • Short-nosed, long-haired and young dogs are more at risk and prone to heat stroke.
  • On hot days, limit exercising your pet to early morning or evening hours.
  • Asphalt gets very hot and could burn your pet’s paws.
  • Pets with light-colored noses or light-colored fur on their ears are vulnerable to sunburn and skin cancer. It’s safe to use sunscreen on their noses and ear tips.


If you’re going out during the summer, it’s best to keep your pet at home, in a cool, air conditioned environment. 

Road Travel Maintains Increasing Trend in 2017

by Erie Insurance on July 8, 2017

 

U.S. road travel is already up 1.5 percent over last year.  So far, motorists have traveled 1.01 trillion miles on U.S. roads and highways in 2017. This matches similar travel trends seen in 2016.

This is positive news for oil refiners, as the driving season (typically the summer months) is just about halfway over. Increases in motor travel will likely have an effect on gasoline consumption, which was still down 2.7 percent at the end of the first quarter this year.

Read the full story from Thomson Reuters online news site, Reuters

ERIE Ranked Highest in J.D. Power Insurance Shopping Studay

Thousands of people recently shared their experiences about shopping for auto insurance in a new national study and Erie Insurance was awarded “Highest Satisfaction with the Auto Insurers Shopping Experience.”

The J.D. Power 2017 U.S. Insurance Shopping StudySM, now in its 11th year, provides an in-depth look at the entire auto insurance policy selection process. It explores why customers shop, their attitudes toward and perceptions of auto insurance brands and how they make their final purchase decision. Satisfaction is measured on three factors (in order of importance):

  • Price—How customers rate their new auto insurance provider on the price of the policy given the level of coverage.

  • Distribution channel—How customers rate their experience interacting with their new auto provider’s agent, call center rep and website.

  • Policy offerings—How customers rate the variety of coverage options, the degree to which their needs are met and the ease of obtaining a new policy.

For the fifth consecutive year, Erie Insurance ranked the highest in the study, with a score of 879 out of 1,000.

The study methodology and other findings

The study is based on responses from more than 16,400 shoppers who requested an auto insurance quote from at least one of the top 25 insurers that have the largest market share in the United States. Customers were surveyed from April 2016 to January 2017.

The study also revealed that shoppers are increasingly reliant on agent recommendations when considering and quoting insurers, compared to 2015 (with 9- and 10-percentage point increases, respectively). Another critical driver of satisfaction is communication. Companies like ERIE that ranked the highest in the study help:

  • Ensure the customer completely understands the coverage.

  • Provide guidance and/or tools for selecting the right coverage.

  • Make certain customers understand their premium calculations.

Are you shopping for insurance?

When you’re shopping for insurance, J.D. Power offers the following tips:

  • Look for an agent with a reputation for integrity and trustworthiness, who can give you thorough advice on the pluses and minuses of various insurers and their products.

  • Compare the terms of various policies and assess how those policies might be affected by factors such as current events, driver performance and acquisition of new vehicles.

  • Be sure you’re well covered in areas where you most need coveragesuch as personal liability (when you hurt other people or their property).

Who Is Erie Insurance?

ERIE has been protecting families and businesses for more than 90 years. The company’s employees and agents follow the Golden Rule—treat others as you would want to be treated. 

“As you can see from this study, our prices, products and service often outshine the competition,” says Doug Smith, executive vice president, sales and products, at Erie Insurance. “When you work with an experienced ERIE agent from your neighborhood, you’ll get coverage that exactly fits your life and never pay more than you should. When something bad happens, we’ll make sure you’re back on your way, right away. We’ve built our reputation for being Above all in Service®.”

In the past year, ERIE has made improvements to the auto insurance quote tool on its website. Shortly after the J.D. Power survey closed in January, ERIE launched a refreshed website. For more information, get in touch with a local ERIE agent.

 

Erie Insurance received the highest numerical score in the J.D. Power 2013–2017 U.S. Insurance Shopping Studies (tied in 2016). The 2017 study is based on 16,424 total responses evaluating 21 providers and measures the experiences and perceptions of customers surveyed between April 2016 and January 2017. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com for more information.

Have a Safe and Happy July 4th Holiday

by Erie Insurance on June 29, 2017

 

Gearing up for the July 4th holiday likely means family picnics, being outside and enjoying a fireworks display. We’ve rounded up our best Independence Day tips and information in preparation for the upcoming holiday weekend. Check out ways to keep you and your family safe while enjoying America’s birthday celebration:

If you're planning your own fireworks display, read these fireworks safety tips and check out the tips on sparkler safety, too.

Before your BBQ, read these grilling safety tips.

Planning on spending time on the water? Read boating best practicesbefore you head out.

Motorcycle Tips if the July 4th holiday will take you out on the open road.

How to Get Your Car Ready for Summer

by Jennifer Sonntag on June 23, 2017

Summer is finally here! Longer days, warmer weather and spending more time outside. We take precautions from the sun and heat when we’re outside, but what about our cars? Did you know that the sun and heat can cause serious damage to your vehicle, too? Here are some tips to help you care for your ride this summer:

Prep work

 

  • Make sure your car’s cooling system is completely flushed and refilled every 24 months, and the levels, condition and concentration of the coolant are checked periodically.
  • Oil and oil filters should also be changed based on your car’s owner’s manual. (Changing the oil and filters every 3,000 miles is a good rule of thumb).
  • Keep your windshield clean and replace worn wiper blades. Be sure to check for plenty of wiper fluid in the reservoir, too.
  • Look at your tires and make sure to check the pressure at least once a month. When you do check, make sure the tires are cooled down and always rotate your tires every 5,000 miles to ensure even wear.
  • Check for changes in the way your brake pedals feel and take your car for repairs immediately if you hear scraping or grinding noises.
  • Remove dirt and insects from your lights and make sure all bulbs are working. Tip:  to prevent scratching, never use a dry rag.
  • Have a professional technician look at your car’s air conditioning system.  A marginally operating system can fail in hot weather. Newer car models have cabin air filters that clean the air entering the heating and air conditioning system.

 

On the road and in the sun

 

  • Keep an eye on your car’s temperature. If you see that it’s getting overheated, you can turn on your car’s heater to pull the air away from the engine to the passenger compartment of the vehicle.
  • During long trips, try to target your driving times for the cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or late evening.
  • When you park your car, try to find a shady spot and crack your window slightly. Leaving your windows cracked an inch will create enough space to vent the hot summer air.
  • Be sure to never leave children or pets in the car, even for a quick errand. A car’s interior temperature can heat up from 78 to 100 degrees in less than three minutes.
  • Update your car’s emergency kit.  While you might need that parka and snow brush for the winter, they won’t do any good for the summer heat. Here’s a sample list of items to include in your summer car emergency kit, in addition to your normal car emergency kit:
     
  • Water:  one gallon, plus one bottle per person
  • Sunscreen, bug spray and hat -- you might have to be outside of your car
  • Blanket: keep this in your car to use for shade
  • First-aid kit
  • Flashlight

 

Another thing you’ll want for your car is auto insurance you can count on. Talk to an Erie Insurance agent in your community to learn more and get a free quote.

Who Will Win the Self-Driving Car Race?

by Erie Insurance on June 16, 2017

 

Who Will Win the Self-Driving Car Race?

Every Memorial Day weekend, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway hosts the Indy 500, the most prestigious event of the IndyCar racing calendar. Thirty-three racecars took to the track this year, but only one driver came out on top:  Takuma Sato. Sato knows the race is grueling and a long-distance test for every driver. He also knows the rewards are more than worth the effort.

In many cases the race to build the first saleable, fully autonomous vehicle for U.S. roads is the same, grueling test. (Except for having a driver, of course) According to a recent report by the data-research company CB Insights, the self-driving car competition currently has more than 33 entries of its own, from the top-selling automakers as well as unconventional ones.

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) released its first Federal Automated Vehicles Policy in September, saying that self-driving cars could lead to an “unprecedented advance in safety on U.S. roads and highways.” According to the DOT, “human error” was responsible for 94 percent of the last year’s auto crashes, during which an estimated 35,200 people lost their lives. So, you could say that whichever company wins the self-driving car race, the real winners will be the passengers.

Tesla blazing the trail

The auto company that’s furthest along—and the one that some say already has won the race—is the unconventional brand, Tesla.

The “Autopilot” technology in the Tesla Model S can operate the car in a wide variety of driving conditions, keeping the vehicle in its lane and on pace with traffic by digitally taking over the brakes, engine and steering wheel. So in a way, there are self-driving cars currently on the road.

To keep heading in the right direction, Tesla released its Autopilot Version 8 software update in September. Key advances include a “more detailed point cloud” that allows the system to access six times as many radar objects as before, as well as the ability to use those objects as part of 3D radar “snapshots” of driving conditions.

The updated Autopilot also allows a crowd-sourced solution to conditions that still challenge the system, such as when an overhead traffic sign seems like it’s in the roadway, due to changes in road elevation. Autopilot will “learn” what the Tesla fleet does in specific scenarios, and will then be able to compare that to what a given driver is doing in the future. When behaviors don’t match up, Autopilot will “know” how to react.

Other competitors in the race

Some of the industry’s mainstream titans are hot on Tesla’s wheels. General Motors, for instance, received a Popular Mechanics “Breakthrough Award” for its Super Cruise semi-autonomous driving technologies in 2013, and the technology is being fine-tuned in the Cadillac CT6 luxury sedan for a production launch later this year. That’s a little later than originally planned, but GM is taking extra time to address the specific concerns shown with Tesla’s Autopilot. A key will be technology similar to that used in drowsiness-alert systems, which can analyze driving behavior and use facial recognition to tell if a driver may be getting sleepy. For Super Cruise, the technology will ensure owners remain engaged in the driving experience.

Separately, GM also spent $1 billion to buy Cruise Automation, an outside company that specializes in autonomous-driving technology. GM also invested half that amount in the Lyft transportation company, a major competitor for Uber. GM expects its investment to pay off in a fleet of self-driving Lyft taxis that’s scheduled to begin testing sometime next year.

Among the automakers setting the pace with GM and Tesla are Audi and Volvo. Audi’s autonomous RS 7 has successfully lapped racetracks in Spain and California with journalists on board, even breaking the track record at the Parcmotor circuit in Barcelona. Further, Audi claims that when its next-gen A8 luxury sedan goes on sale next year, it will offer Level 3 autonomy. That means the driver can “cede full control” to the vehicle in certain scenarios, and “rely heavily” on the automatic driving functions.

At Volvo, the brand is building on its present line of driver-assistance measures with self-driving versions of its XC90 SUV. They’re part of the Drive Me project in Gothenburg, Sweden, where the vehicles will be given to “normal, everyday families” for testing on public roads. From there, the automaker expects to have autonomous driving technology ready for commercial use by 2021.

Volvo also serves up a fair amount of self-driving technology for its 2016-2017 roster. The new Volvo S90 is a prime example, thanks to a Pilot Assist function that can automatically steer the car even when it’s not following traffic.

Tech companies revving their engines

Conspicuously missing from the discussion so far are the self-driving cars from the technology companies. With all the buzz about those cute little Google-mobiles and continuing rumors about an Apple car, neither is likely to end up in customer driveways anytime soon. The barriers to entry in the auto industry are sky-high, from the costs needed to produce them, to who gets to sell them.

Remember, in many states, it’s illegal for Tesla to sell its vehicles directly to the public. Tesla got its start by repurposing cars built by another company—Lotus—and still only sells about 5,100 vehicles a month. Ford sells that number of F-150 pickups in fewer than 2.5 days. A future based on self-driving cars will require production capabilities closer to the former than the latter.

That helps explain why Google, for one, has partnered with Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles for a new phase in autonomous-driving research. This time, the initiative is backed by a fleet of 100 Chrysler Pacifica minivans and a focus on ways to add autonomous-driving technology to the assembly line.

Other prominent tech collaborations include that between Microsoft and Toyota, as well as between Intel and BMW. Also, mirroring GM and Lyft, Uber has turned to Ford to explore self-driving cars. Meanwhile, The New York Times notes that Apple has “shuttered parts of its self-driving car project and laid off dozens of employees.”

As each carmaker makes its final lap toward the finish line, consumers await this cutting-edge technology that will also be a big win for passenger safety.

Make sure you and your car are adequately protected. Talk to an Erie Insurance agent about auto insurance coverage or get a quote online.

From a young age, Charles Krome felt destined to work in the automotive industry, growing up in Motor City with a last name like Krome. As an automotive writer for CARFAX, a leading used-car shopping website, Charles shares consumer advice on how to keep up with emerging technology when it comes to car buying.

The Hidden Cost of Car Ownership

by Nancy Daniel on June 6, 2017

 

When you think about the costs of owning a car, what do you think of - the gas, maintenance or maybe insurance?  Actually, depreciation is often one of the larger expenses of car ownership.

According to U.S. News & World Report, new vehicles lose value at an average decline of 15-25 percent each year during the first five years. And whether new or used, all vehicles lose value over time.  Since the rate of depreciation varies by vehicle model, it’s a good idea to take resale value into consideration when shopping for your new ride.  

According to the experts at Kelley Blue Book, picking a vehicle with excellent resale value is very likely the most important thing you can do when it comes to keeping costs down.  Paying a fair price for the car and securing a good loan rate can be undone by poor resale value, because eventually you’re going to sell it or trade it in.

Cars that retain a higher value

If you’re car shopping this year, it appears that bigger vehicles are depreciating better. Trucks and SUVs appear in nine of the top 10 spots on the Kelly Blue Book 2017 Best Resale Value Awards. Per Kelley, while the average new vehicle will be worth about 33 percent of its original sticker price after 60 months, the top 10 vehicles on their list will return an average of 50 percent to their owners at resale time.

The Kelley authorities say that choosing a car with good resale value can often save you more money in the long run than going for big rebates and other incentives.

New cars that may lose value the quickest

To highlight the other end of the spectrum, Forbes magazine shared the results of a study conducted by the used-vehicle website Carlypso.com.  Among the top 10 vehicles expected to have resale issues were the Nissan Leaf, Dodge Charger, Volkswagen Beetle, Mitsubishi Lancer and Kia Optima.

A little research goes a long way

When you’re ready to shop for your next vehicle, it will pay to do some research on resale value before making an investment. Whichever new (or used) car you choose, Erie Insurance can ensure that investment is protected with a great auto policy at a great price. And we can help you take care of the depreciation issue, too, with a coverage endorsement that provides true replacement value.

It’s called New Auto Security, and you can ask your agent to add it to your ERIE auto policy. If you’ve had your new car less than two years and it gets totaled, ERIE will reimburse you the cost to replace it with the newest model year. And if your new car is in an accident but it’s not a total loss, ERIE will pay to repair the vehicle without a deduction for depreciation.

If your vehicle is past its second birthday, ERIE will pay the cost to replace it with another vehicle of the same model that is two years newer. That means the coverage is good to have no matter what the age of your vehicle.

Reaching out to a local Erie Insurance agent  is a good way to start your research. He or she can explain the coverage details and get you a quote.

A vehicle is considered new when it is less than two years old and is owned by the original purchaser. Eligible vehicles must carry both comprehensive and collision coverage, and the policy deductible will be applied at the time of a claim. Insurance products are subject to terms, conditions and exclusions not described in this post. The endorsement is sold on a per-vehicle basis, not per policy, and contains the specific details of the coverages, terms, conditions and exclusions. Coverage is not available in all states. Please refer to our disclaimer and talk to an ERIE agent for policy details.

811: The Number to Call Before Digging

by Carolyn Sennett on May 24, 2017

 

Whether you’re planning a DIY home improvement project or hiring a contractor, there’s a number to call before digging in your yard.

Don’t know the number to call before digging? That would be an easy 811. Calling it will get your underground utility lines marked and your project off to a safe start.

Utility services such as cable TV, telephone, electric, gas, water and sewer are often buried underground. Unintentionally striking one of these lines could result in power outages for entire neighborhoods, harm to yourself or someone else, and repair costs.

The free, federally mandated national number to call before digging aims to make the process easier. Instead of looking up phone numbers for all the local utility companies, you just need to call 811.

Does every digging project require a call?

Yes. Whether it’s putting a mailbox into the ground, installing a fence, planting trees, building a patio or deck, or excavating a new garden area, officials say that you should call 811.

What’s the process?

You need to dial 811 several days before you plan to start your digging project. When you do, a representative will collect your information and notify local utility companies of your intent to dig.

Once you make the call, a professional will visit the dig site to mark the approximate location of all underground utility lines with spray paint or flags. The utility service paint or flags colors are:

  • Red: Electric

  • Orange: Communications, telephone/CATV

  • Blue: Potable water

  • Green: Sewer/Drainage

  • Yellow: Gas/Petroleum pipeline

  • Purple: Reclaimed water

  • White: Site of intended excavation

How long will it take?

Most crews will arrive to mark your property within a few days. Be sure to check your state’s one-call center for more detailed information. Each state has different rules and regulations about digging.

The crew will make sure you know exactly where (and where not) to dig. The depths of utility lines may vary, and there may be multiple utility lines in the same area. Once your site is marked, it is safe to begin digging outside of the identified areas.

Plan on digging?

If you’re digging as part of a home improvement project, you’ll want to call your insurance agent. A home improvement project could increase the value of your home, so you’ll want to be sure you have the proper amount of coverage.

Typical homeowners insurance policies do not provide coverage for damage to underground service lines or pipes. The lines can be damaged during excavation or digging from the weight of vehicles or equipment above ground. The costs to repair the damage can be substantial.  If you have an ErieSecure Home® insurance policy, you can purchase service line coverage to help with the expensive repair costs. Ask an ERIE agent for more information about the coverage (and if it’s available in your state).

The story was originally published on June 10, 2015. It was updated with new information. 

Six Questions to Ask an Insurance Agent

by Carolyn Sennett on May 18, 2017

 

When your life changes oftentimes your insurance needs to change, too. Yet it’s not always clear what kind of insurance protection fits you, your family or your business. What a family of six needs is much different than what a single 20-something needs. That’s why at ERIE, an insurance agent is there to help you get everything squared away. 

Here are six questions you should ask your agent:

1. My family is growing and changing. What coverage should I consider?

Life insurance* is something most families need. The primary reason most people buy life insurance is to protect their loved ones from the financial burden after an  unexpected death. To get a rough idea of how much you’d need, check out ERIE’s Life Insurance Calculator.

A typical homeowners policy covers personal belongings and furnishings up to certain policy limits. For higher-valued items, such as a diamond ring, a rare piece of art or expensive electronic equipment, you may want to expand your protection with higher policy limits or extra coverage.

If a teenager in your home is learning how to drive, you’ll definitely need additional auto insurance once the teen is licensed.

2. Do I need additional insurance if I’m remodeling or adding on to my home?

In some cases, remodeling projects can increase your home’s value. If they do, you’ll want to adjust your insurance coverage so your home’s reconstruction cost is fully protected. Your insurance agent can help advise you in this situation. He or she can also let you know more about the kinds of insurance a contractor should have in place before work begins.

3. I’m fresh out of school and new to the workforce. What coverage do I need?

If you’ve left home and are renting an apartment, you’re no longer covered by your parents’ homeowners policy. Instead, you’ll need renters insurance to cover your belongings and more.

When it comes to auto insurance, you may be tempted to buy a bare bones policy to save money. That’s a risky move because it may not give you enough protection. If your insurance policy doesn’t cover all the damages, your savings and future wages could be at stake.

If you have student loans or debts, ask an insurance agent about life insurance. It may not be something you want to think about, but you want enough life insurance coverage to cover final expenses like a funeral service if something were to happen to you.

If someone like a parent cosigned on your loan, life insurance can help them avoid getting stuck with the bill. The good news? Life insurance is far cheaper than most people think—and that’s especially true when you’re young and healthy.

4. What coverage do I need for my home-based business?

From inventory to libel issues to customers visiting your home, home-based businesses definitely need coverage. Depending on the nature of your home-based business, you may need a simple endorsement to your homeowners insurance policy or a new policy.

5. A friend was sued after a car accident. How can I make sure I’m protected against something like this?

Your insurance policy already includes liability coverage, yet state minimums are almost never enough for most drivers. Having too little liability coverage puts you and your assets at risk.

Personal Catastrophe Liability (PCL) coverage (commonly known as “umbrella” insurance) provides an extra layer of liability protection over and above your auto and homeowners policies in the event that you (or a covered family member) are sued. For most people, an extra $1 million in coverage costs less than $20 a month. Your insurance agent can review your auto insurance policy limits and tell you more about PCL.

6. How can I save money on my insurance?

Nearly all insurers offer price breaks on coverage based on having a safe driving record and bundling your auto and homeowners coverage. Talk to your ERIE agent to find out more. There are also other ways to lower your bill.

It’s important, though, to be cautious about selecting an insurance company based solely on price. Instead, seek out companies with reputations for excellent customer service, strong financial standing and a reputation for handling claims quickly and fairly.

No matter what stage of life that you’re in, seek the advice of an insurance professional like an Erie Insurance agent. He or she can help you find the right coverage at the right price to fit your needs.

*Erie Family Life insurance policies are not available in New York.

Ask ERIE: When Should I Add My New Teen Driver To My Auto Policy?

by Amanda Prischak on May 1, 2017

 

ERIE requires new teen drivers to be added to a parent or guardian’s auto policy or take out their own policy once they get their license. If your teen driver only has a learner’s permit, he or she is automatically covered under your policy—so no need to touch base with your ERIE Agent just yet.

Add to my policy or get their own?

Deciding whether to add newly licensed drivers to your existing auto policy or have them take out their own policy comes down to the car they’re using.

If they’re using your car, they will be covered under your policy the same way you are. This means they get policy benefits like Feature 15, which never allows your policy to be surcharged for an at-fault accident after your auto policy has been in force for 15 years. The only things your teen driver won’t have are certain rights like the ability to modify deductibles and other coverages—those are reserved for the main policyholder.

You’ll want to take out a policy in your teen driver’s name if he or she holds the car title. If you buy your teen driver a car and you hold the title, you can still add the young driver to your policy. This is usually a less expensive option since your teen benefits from your driving record.

No matter how you choose to insure your teen driver, it’s important to do it as soon as he or she is licensed. Every driver in your house needs protection—and that’s especially true with inexperienced teen drivers. ERIE also aims to assess a fair and accurate premium based on all the drivers in your house, and that’s impossible to
do when drivers aren’t properly disclosed.

If a new teen driver isn’t added to a policy and gets in an accident, ERIE typically covers the claim. However, you may be charged back premium from the time when the teen driver became licensed and should have been added to the policy up to the present time.

Keeping costs in check

Teen drivers are typically more expensive to insure because they lack a solid driving record and get into more accidents on average than more experienced drivers. That said, there are a few ways to keep car premiums for new teen drivers under control.

They include:

• Choosing ERIE Rate Lock®: With this optional feature, your low, locked-in premium will never change—even if you submit a claim—until you add or remove a vehicle or driver, or change your primary residence.1
• Changing your deductibles: You can choose to have different collision and comprehensive deductibles for your teen driver than for yourself under the same policy. Choosing a higher deductible typically lowers the premium.
 Taking an accident prevention course: ERIE offers a discount to teen drivers who complete certain accident prevention programs. Many states only let insurers offer discounts for certain approved programs, so talk with your ERIE Agent before enrolling your teen in a course to make sure it’s discount eligible.
 Maintaining a clean driving record: ERIE has a youthful driver discount for teens who maintain a clean driving record and who meet a few other requirements. Your ERIE Agent can tell you more about it.

As a parent or guardian, you play a big role in helping your teen drive responsibly. Take the time to talk with your teen about the importance of driving safely and avoiding distracted driving.

10 Top Springtime Pet Dangers

by Amanda Prischak on April 27, 2017

From flowers to warm weather, spring ushers in all kinds of changes.

Yet not all of these are welcome changes when it comes to your pet. But knowing what dangers they should avoid can go a long way toward keeping your furry friend safe. Here are the top 10 springtime pet dangers worth being aware of.

  1. Windows with no screens. Who doesn’t love a fresh spring breeze? However, a wide open window offers an easy escape route for pets—so either keep windows closed or pop some screens in them.
  2. More time outdoors. This is definitely a good thing so long as your pet is microchipped and wears a tag in case he or she gets loose.
  3. Fleas. Warm weather brings out fleas and other bugs, so make sure your pet has the right flea/tick and heartworm medications.
  4. Indoor chemicals. Spring cleaning is great for your house, but not always so great for your pet. Read all cleaning labels to make sure they are okay to use when you have pets in the home.
  5. Outdoor chemicals. Many lawn treatments can be harmful to pets. Store these items out of reach of your pets, follow all directions and consider keeping your pets off treated areas for several days.
  6. Toxic plants and flowers. Both indoor and outdoor plants and flowers can be toxic to pets. Check this list to get a complete idea of which plants and flowers to avoid depending on which pet(s) share your home.
  7. Home improvement tools. If you plan on doing some home improvement this spring, it’s a good idea to keep your pets in a separate room while the work is going on. Power tools, as well as small screws, nails, blades and more, can put them in danger.
  8. Allergies. Just like their human owners, dogs and cats can develop allergies to pollen, dust, flowers, plants and bees. Signs of an allergic reaction include itching, sniffling and sneezing. Allergies can be life threatening in some circumstance, so call your vet ASAP if you notice any of these symptoms.
  9. Snakes. There are 20 varieties of venomous snakes in the United States—and they’re found in nearly every state. Keep an eye on your pet when they’re outdoors, and get them to a vet ASAP if they get bit.
  10. Too much exercise. After many months of being cooped up , your pets may do too much, too soon when they rediscover the great outdoors. Help prevent exercise-related injuries by starting slow and limiting the time spent outdoors until they rebuild some lost muscle tone.

If your pet runs into trouble, call your vet or the Pet Poison Helpline® at 855-764-7661.

When and How to Replace Windshield Wipers

by Amanda Prischak on April 17, 2017

 

During the rainy spring season, many people realize just how important windshield wipers are.

Yet like anything in your car, they don’t last forever. Constant exposure to the elements makes them one of the fastest wearing parts of your car.

When to replace windshield wipers

Windshield wipers typically only last about six months to a year. Telltale signs that it’s time to replace yours include:

  • The edges are frayed or fold up.
  • They leave behind streaks when you use them.
  • They make a scraping sound.

    After battling snow and freezing rain all winter, wipers are often ready for replacement when spring arrives. 

 

How to replace windshield wipers

  • The good news is that it can cost as little as $20 to replace your windshield wipers, and the job can take less than one minute. Here are some tips when it comes to choosing ones for your car.

  • Check your user’s manual. Your car manufacturer will list what kind of windshield wipers work with your particular car.
  • Read some reviews. When it comes to windshield wipers, there is a wide range of styles and prices. Narrow the list by reading a few reviews from reputable sources like Consumer Reports.
  • Consider the season. Many manufacturers make more expensive winter wipers that do a better job ridding windshields of ice and snow.
  • Check the price. While more expensive blades might do a better job of clearing rain, experts caution that they probably need to be replaced just as often.
  • Decide if you’ll DIY or not. Replacing windshield wipers isn’t especially hard to do—but also know that many auto supply stores will do the job for free if you buy your wipers there.
  • Top off your windshield wiper fluid. Having enough means you’ll always be able to wipe away bugs, grime and other gunk from your windshield.
  • Keep them clean and protected. You can help extend the life of your windshield wipers by cleaning them off with a wet towel every few weeks, making an effort to park in the shade and using an ice scraper to de-ice your windshield instead of using your wipers. 

5 Security Tips for Your New Home

by Jessica Thiefels on April 5, 2017

 

When you think of home security, you probably imagine expensive, intricate systems that cost more than you’re willing to shell out—especially after buying a new home.

But that’s not always the case. Good home security doesn’t require a pricey, state-of-the-art system. In many cases, small changes and habits are all you need to keep burglars at bay.

Keep these five security tips in mind as you move into your new home. They can save you from spending on an expensive system, while enjoying the same peace of mind.

1. Fake cameras actually work. Fake security cameras sound funny—and ineffective—but don’t rule them out. Not only are they a fraction of the cost of an actual security camera, but, "Most fake security cameras have a noticeable blinking LED light that deters criminals at night when they’re most active," according to home security experts. If the light stops blinking, just replace the batteries.

Purchase a few to place around the front and even rear entrances to your house to provide maximum protection. Don’t forget to pair them with “This home is protected by…” security stickers. These stickers can be purchased for less than $10 online. This makes your fake cameras seem even more real.

2. Fewer windows=good move. Adding more windows to boost the amount of natural light into your home might look good, but they make your house a more attractive option for intruders. Nearly 30 percent of burglars gain access to a home through an unlocked door or window—and windows on the first floor are especially common targets. It’s easy to forgot to lock windows after opening them to get fresh air, and that can be a costly mistake. If your garage door has windows, tint them so intruders can’t see if you’re home or away. The same goes for your front door and first floor windows—invest in blinds and keep them closed for the best line of defense. You can also put a frosted coating on the lower half of your windows, which only lets outsiders  see only through the top half. These come in peel and stick form, so you can make this update quickly and economically.

3. Make your home look occupied. It’s become increasingly common for break-ins to occur during daylight hours, since most people are away at work, the kids are at school and the neighbors aren’t out and about to notice anything suspicious. Here are a few ways to make your home look more active during the day to deter potential burglars:

  • Have landscapers come at all different times of the day so there’s someone there in the morning, afternoon and evening. It will be harder for burglars to spot a pattern this way.

     

  • Keep lights on in the most visible rooms in the house. You can install a timer to have them turned on and off if you don’t want them on for eight hours straight.

     

  • Don’t let mail pile up while you’re away, which is a clear sign that no one is home. Ask a friend or neighbor to pick it up each morning and leave it in your home. This way, if anyone is watching, it appears as though people are checking in and going in and out of the home.

4. Consider your landscaping. Believe it or not, your landscaping can deter criminals. People who are attempting to break into a house want somewhere to hide if the mailman drives up or a neighbor comes outside. If you have large trees or bushes planted along the first story of your house, it gives burglars a great place to wait it out.

Avoid this easy hideaway by keeping your landscaping simple, trimmed and polished. Plant bushes that are low to the ground and provide maximum protection—think rose bushes or citrus plants that have spiny leaves. Also consider using gravel instead of mulch so you can hear when someone approaches your home.

5. Video doorbells are worth checking out. One new way to keep your home safe and deter your kids from opening the door to strangers is a video doorbell. More affordable than most security cameras, these easy-to-install gadgets provide on-demand video, a live view of your front porch at all times and motion detection alerts sent straight to your smartphone.

Several of the newer models allow two-way audio so you can communicate with anyone who rings your doorbell, even if you aren’t home. These are a great security feature if you have kids who open the door for strangers or if your door doesn’t have a peephole.

Jessica Thiefels has been writing for more than 10 years and is currently a lifestyle blogger. She’s written for Reader’s Digest, AARP, Lifehack, Homes.com and more. Follow her on Twitter @Jlsander07 for money-saving ideas, health tips and more.

17 Loves Worth Insuring

by Amanda Prischak on February 8, 2017

 

Groundhog Day, Valentine’s Day, Presidents’ Day—February may be the shortest month of the year, but there is a lot going on.

You can also add Insure Your Love Month to that list. The nonprofit organization Life Happens creates and coordinates the campaign each year in recognition of the number one that people buy life insurance:Because they love someone and want to make sure they’d be financially protected if something unfortunate happened.

When people think of who they’d protect with life insurance, they typically think of kids and spouses. But there are many other people—and nonpeople!—who can benefit from life insurance. Here’s a list of “loves” that can be protected or benefit from a life insurance policy.

  1. Your husband
  2. Your wife
  3. Your domestic partner
  4. Your child
  5. Someone who’s like a child to you
  6. Your stepchild
  7. Your grandchild
  8. Your niece
  9. Your nephew
  10. Your mom
  11. Your dad
  12. Someone who was like a mom or dad to you
  13. Your favorite waitress who could really use a windfall
  14. Your place of worship
  15. Your favorite charity
  16. Your alma mater
  17. A trust that can benefit your pet

If someone or something on this list could benefit from life insurance protection, now is the time to talk about how to insure your love. An insurance professional like an Erie Insurance agent can tell you about options that work with your life and budget.

 

 

4 Things to Avoid When Using Public Wi-Fi

by Carolyn Sennett on March 8, 2017

 

Public Wi-Fi helps us stay connected no matter where we go. It’s convenient to use at a coffee shop, a neighborhood restaurant or the airport, but how safe is it? Unfortunately, cyber criminals can log in to the same free network that you do and attempt to gain access to your devices and personal information.

“The Wi-Fi may be free, but that doesn’t mean your online activities are safe,” says Cheryl Lorei, a senior IT analyst at Erie Insurance who has worked in information security for 15 years. “The big concern with public Wi-Fi is that your information could be available to anyone on the network. It’s nothing against the businesses that offer free Wi-Fi, it’s just that they’re not in the business of keeping your personal information safe.”

Four tips to help make your online activities more secure

Here are a few key things that you need know about public Wi-Fi security and how to keep your personal information safe.

  1. Watch out for phony Wi-Fi access points. Fake routers are designed to look legitimate, but hackers operate them. With this popular method, called a man-in-the-middle attack, the invader tries to get between you and your personal information that is stored on a banking website or in an email. “These situations can be difficult to detect,” says Lorei. “If you don’t know who is running the network, don’t use it. Always ask the business owner or hotel to verify the network name before you connect to it.” Once you’re finished, remove the public Wi-Fi connection from your device. If your device is still in the mode of actively trying to connect, a hacker may notice and create a phony access point.

     

  2. Limit your activity while using public Wi-Fi. When you’re using free Wi-Fi, it’s not a good time to shop online, use social media or access your bank account or email. “You want to avoid visiting websites that save and store your personal passwords or credit card numbers,” says Lorei. “You could inadvertently make it easy for someone to access your personal information. Once they have your password, they will try to reuse it repeatedly to access other sites to gain more information about you.”

     

  3. Use secured websites or a VPN service. Generally, it’s best to access secured websites that begin with https rather than http. The s in the address is an indication that the site uses a secured encryption Web protocol to protect the confidentiality of online activities or transactions. A virtual private network (VPN) also offers a connection that is encrypted and secured. VPN can help protect you from digital eavesdropping even when you’re on public Wi-Fi. The fees for basic VPN services are less than $10 a month.

     

  4. Turn your smartphone into a secured personal hot spot. Most mobile phones can be turned into hot spots and support several devices at once. However, check your data plan before you try it to avoid unexpected expenses. “Personal hot spots are popular alternatives, but you still need to do your research about how to protect and secure the connection,” Lorei says.

Once your identity is stolen, it can be difficult to recover. “Unfortunately, you’re not going to be able to flip a switch to restore everything,” Lorei says. “It’s a smart move to do all you can to protect yourself.”

Insurance coverage is available for identity theft and fraud. With Erie Insurance’s Identity Recovery Coverage, you’ll get help with the recovery process and coverage for expenses like charges for credit reports, lost wages and even some legal fees. The cost of the coverage is low—about $20 a year—and it can be added to a home or renters insurance policy. A local Erie Insurance agent can tell you more about the details.

On the Horizon: Better Seat Belts for Seniors

One of the safest choices drivers and passengers can make is to buckle up. Now, researchers want to make the standard seat belt even safer for seniors who account for tens of millions of drivers in the U.S.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, close to 600 older adults are injured each day in car crashes. Common life-threatening injuries include cracked ribs and broken pelvises. If the seat belt is positioned incorrectly around the neck or under the arm of an older driver, it can cause injuries and even fatalities.

Better safety solutions

Researchers at Ohio State University are collaborating with automakers to investigate other options to help reduce severe injuries in drivers 65 and older. Just one includes an inflatable seat belt. The project is also using simulations and smaller crash test dummies to help design better protection for older drivers.

Inflatable seat belts are available in the back seats in some Ford, Lincoln and Mercedes-Benz models. Ford introduced inflatable seat belt technology in 2011 saying it would enhance safety for backseat passengers like young children.

In addition to inflatable seat belts, future technology may offer a personalized car key fob to activate a customized safety system within each vehicle. The key fob could adjust a seat belt based on a driver’s individual physiology. To learn more, check out the source article on Reuters for more information.

10 Ways for Your Business to Deliver Great Customer Service

by Amanda Prischak on September 14, 2016

 

At the heart of every great business is great service. And there are certain things that businesses with a reputation for incredible service all do.

Curious about what they are—and ready to take your business’s service to the next level? If so, here are 10 tips to do just that.

  1. Greet each person who walks through the door. It’s a small gesture, but it goes a long way.
  2. Empower your employees. In addition to knowing how to do a job, your employees need to know how to treat a customer. Share your service guidelines with new employees—and offer refreshers to veteran employees as needed.
  3. Offer customer comment cards. Giving customers the opportunity to weigh in shows that you care about their experience—and helps keep you in the loop when it comes to what diners really want.
  4. Have a web presence. People want to learn about your hours and other specific things about your business  online. website is best, but a Facebook® page with photos and information about your business can work as well.
  5. Respond to online comments. Whether someone leaves a comment on a social media page, a review website like Yelp or sends a message through your website, it’s important to acknowledge and respond to each one.
  6. Offer a customer loyalty program. Did you know that it costs anywhere from five to 10 times more to gain a new customer than it does to sell to an existing one? One way to keep loyal customers is with a customer loyalty program. There are several kinds of programs to consider, so definitely read up on how to create an effective customer loyalty program for your business.
  7. Send out an e-newsletter. E-newsletters can inform your customers of specials, new dishes and events. Also consider offering special subscriber-only coupons through yours.
  8. Immediately acknowledge any issues. If a customer has a legitimate complaint—or you simply sense that things aren’t up to snuff—act fast. Immediately acknowledge the issue and apologize if necessary. Consider adding a discount to the work performed or offering an upgrade to compensate for the inconvenience.
  9. Give them something extra. Let customers know how much you appreciate them by offering a little something extra from time to time. Some ideas can include an unexpected discount, a small gift or promotional swag.
  10. If possible, offer a guarantee. A money-back guarantee or a performance guarantee can entice customers to buy and shows them you’re serious about service.

ERIE believes that service is as important for an insurance company as it is for a small business. That’s why ERIE—whose motto has been Above all in Service® since 1925—has a reputation for settling claims fast and fairly. It’s also why your ERIE policy includes access to a local risk control consultant who can evaluate potential hazards and recommend measures to reduce common risks.

Contact your ERIE agent to day to learn more about ERIE’s business coverage and to get a free quote.